ABOUT

News

11.06.2014

Insilico Medicine, Inc Announces Research Collaboration with Champions Oncology, Inc

Insilico Medicine, Inc and Champions Oncology announce research collaboration on drug discovery and in silico drug efficacy evaluation in oncology

BALTIMORE, November 06, 2014 – Insilico Medicine, Inc, a Baltimore-based bioinformatics company focused on research in aging and age related diseases announced a research collaboration with the international leader in personalized medicine of cancer, Champions Oncology, Inc.

“There are many companies utilizing advances in genomics for personalized medicine, but Champions Oncology’s TumorGraft technology is unique in a way that it can validate the chemotherapy regimen experimentally generating vast amounts of valuable data. Our bioinformatic analysis showed that molecular signatures of patient tumor grafts in mice are very similar to signatures of cancer in patients before and after treatment. We established this research collaboration to further validate these preliminary findings,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

Champions TumorGrafts are a personalized approach used to guide physician treatment decisions for cancer patients. A piece of the patient’s living tumor is removed during surgery or biopsy and engrafted in immune-deficient mice. After the TumorGraft grows, still closely resembling the patient’s tumor, Champions Oncology tests drug treatments in the TumorGraft and measures the response. TumorGraft has demonstrated high rates of predictability using multiple therapies, including single-agent and combination, chemotherapy regimens and targeted biological drugs.

Every TumorGraft is preserved as a living sample for future patient use. These banked TumorGrafts can be re-grown and tested in the event of cancer progression or recurrence. In oncology drug development, TumorGraft models are utilized extensively by pharmaceutical and biotechnology organizations to predict the clinical effectiveness of their compounds in targeted patient populations.

“Our preliminary collaboration with Insilico Medicine showed some exciting results that may be of interest to both the academic and industry communities,” said KerenPaz, chief Scientific Officer at Champions Oncology.
In the scope of this research collaboration Insilico Medicine will analyze a portion of Champions Oncology gene expression data sets from tumor grafts before and after treatment with chemotherapy drugs and compare the signaling pathway activation state(SPAS) changes with the SPAS changes in human patients.

“Champions’ Tumorgraft technology stems from many years of breakthrough science generated in the most credible, productive and innovative cancer research laboratories headed by Dr. David Sidransky, who’s work we greatly admire. We believe that the TumorGraft technology has broad applications in drug discovery and drug repurposing in aging and age-related diseases that were previously overlooked. This research collaboration may pave the way for a comprehensive drug discovery and development pipeline, where drugs and drug candidates may be selected and prioritized using in silico approaches and tested in human tissues engrafted into Champions Oncology mice or other animal models,” said Qingsong Zhu, PhD, Chief Operating Officer, Insilico Medicine, Inc.

10.28.2014

Three-company collaboration announced for advancement of aging research

BALTIMORE, October 28, 2014 – Through this unique partnership, the Baltimore-based Insilico Medicine and Lethbridge-based CCARL will provide expertise in aging research and build on the personalized medicine and drug discovery platforms OncoFinder and GeroScope to develop new systems for age-related diseases. During the first phase of collaboration, Insilico Medicine and CCARL drug discovery and personalized medicine efforts will focus on Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Plantbiosis will simultaneously validate the system, experimentally.

Through its agreement with the University of Lethbridge, Plantbiosis has access to state of the art gene expression, sequencing, epigenetic research, metagenomic, cell line banks and cell culture facilities. It also brings over five years of experience in data acquisition, mining and processing and complements access to infrastructure with a team of trained scientists and technicians.

“Aging is a true global pandemic, which kills more people daily than any other disease and extending productive longevity will not only decrease pain and suffering, but will also provide a significant boost to the global economy. However, before we can look for interventions that may be effective in slowing down the aging processes, we need to understand the systemic changes in defensive and pathological states in many age-related diseases. We started this journey in cancer and now we are going after other diseases that will help us gather the data for a grand plan of attack on aging. And while we are already helping improve decision making in clinical oncology with OncoFinder, we are happy to collaborate on development of a platform to better personalize disease modifying drugs for treatment of multiple sclerosis”, said Olga Kovalchuk, MD/PhD, MBA, CEO of Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Ltd.

During the course of collaboration, the companies will build a statistical database of tissue-specific changes in signalome, interactome and epigenome in a variety of age-related diseases and normal aging to understand the intricate interplay between pathologic and defensive states.

“We are very happy to partner with CCARL and Plantbiosis led by the highly-productive ambitious and driven scientists, who are looking beyond classical approaches to age-related disease research and are going after the grand prize, which is aging. They are looking to change the biomedical paradigm from treatment to prevention and are the only companies in Canada with the vision and tools to do that”, said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

10.23.2014

InSilico Medicine announces collaboration — Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories

Insilico Medicine to fund CCARL’s pilot research study in personalized medicine and aging research.

BALTIMORE, October 23, 2014 – InSilico Medicine, the company focused on drug discovery for cancer and age-related diseases, announced its investment in a research collaboration with Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Inc (CCARL). The companies will collaborate on improving decision making in clinical oncology and discovery, and personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis (MS).

“Dr. Olga Kovalchuk was included into Canada’s 40 under 40 and 25 most influential women in the Canadian market for a very good reason. We were very impressed by the level of enthusiasm, expertise and quality of scientific research in genetics and epigenetics in her lab at the University of Lethbridge. CCARL has many innovative ideas on how to apply aging research to drug discovery and personalized medicine and accelerate human trials. They came up with a very clever trick on how to extrapolate some of the personalized medicine in oncology to multiple sclerosis. Their world-class team brings decades of experience in epigenetics, metagenomics and proteomics and approaching aging from a completely new angle which may result in practical applications within the next several years. Solving aging will require a concerted global effort and we would like to partner with one of the top research teams in Canada”, said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

The mechanisms and causes of multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory disease on nerve cells, are not fully understood. MS commonly reveals itself between ages of 20 and 50, and results in significant decrease in life expectancy and loss of productivity. This partnership aims to advance knowledge and science dedicated to this disease and more.

“To my knowledge CCARL is the first company in Canada to engage into personalized medicine in clinical oncology with the aim to better understand the underlying age-related pathologic processes and use that knowledge for geroprotectors discovery”, said Evgeny Makariev, director of aging research at Insilico Medicine, Inc.

“We are happy to receive an investment from and establish a research collaboration with some of the world’s top thought leaders in Big Data analysis for aging research. We are already using the OncoFinder platform for improving decision making in clinical oncology and will be using a significantly more expanded system for MS. Understanding MS will help us unlock several misteries of aging at once”, said Olga Kovalchuk, PhD, CEO of CCARL.

09.30.2014

First mapping that reveals the molecular pathway for MDSC cancer progression

InSilico Medicine and partners provide a clear, illustrative map that allows scientists to understand MDSC conditions, and furthermore the means to infiltrate them

BALTIMORE, September 30, 2014 – Scientists from InSilico Medicine and its partners successfully established a visual mapping of the molecular pathway cancer progression originating from myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC). The damage and immune suppression the cells cause are not fully understood, however this is a major stepping stone in creating necessary transparency.

“MDSCs are elicited by tumor-derived factors from precursors present in hematopoietic organs such as the bone marrow and possibly spleen. This population of cells suppresses the activity of various types of immune cells and contributes to tumor progression by promoting tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. But the key transcriptional regulators of MDSC are still poorly defined. Alex and colleagues used bioinformatic tools to investigate the pathway interactome maps in colon and breast cancer models. Several proliferation and invasion-related pathways were identified in infiltrating MDSC. It opens a door to new therapy targeting MDSC in these diseases. ” says Qingsong Zhu, COO of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

###
More on the study can be found here: http://www.impactjournals.com/oncotarget/index.php?journal=oncotarget&page=article&op=view&path%5B%5D=2489&path%5B%5D=4445.

09.25.2014

The Future of Aging and Aging Disease Prevention is Bright with the Growth of InSilico Medicine’s Scientific Advisory Board

BALTIMORE, September 25, 2014 – InSilico Medicine proudly announces that Donald Small, MD, PhD, Kristen Fortney, PhD and Alexey Moskalev, DSc will aid the company’s mission to successful drug discovery and personalized medicine. It is clear meaningful progress is being made to battle aging from InSilico Medicine, considering the past major SAB additions.

Dr. Small serves as the Director of the Pediatric Oncology Division of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. His motivation to play a role in the lives of young cancer patients tremendously impacts his research goals and long term efforts. The InSilico team is very excited to see how his experience will inspire the ongoing research and development.

“InSilico Medicine is poised to make major contributions to treat aging and other diseases. Their proprietary software and brilliant young scientists have impressed me. I look forward to contributing in any way I can to their strategies and discoveries,” said Dr. Small.

Kristen Fortney is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University, where she works on the genetics of human longevity. She obtained a PhD from the University of Toronto. Her work consists of the application of computational biology tools to problems in translational medicine, focusing on aging and age-related disease. The technical guidance she will have to offer will play a large role in development and future goals of InSilico Medicine.

“InSilico Medicine has an innovative informatics approach to find new therapies that may treat age-related disease and slow aging. I am excited to join the InSilico Medicine advisory team and look forward to working with them to advance their technology,” said Dr. Fortney.

Dr. Moskalev, from the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Center of RAS is Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology. He also teaches at Syktyvkar State University. Much of his focus has been on DNA repair and molecular mechanisms involved with aging. Dr. Moskalev’s leadership and global knowledge of aging research will play a key role in the delivery of InSilico Medicine’s solutions.

“While experiments in model organisms are extremely important for both cancer and aging research, advances in computing, availability of the vast amount of omics data and rapidly improving understanding of the underlying molecular processes allow for the many experiments to be performed in silico. The GeroScope system developed by Insilico Medicine at the very least allows to narrow down the large lists of geroprotective drugs to be tested in animals and for some drugs and combinations directly in humans. The system may be used for improving clinical trials decisions and possibly for personalized preventative medicine,” said Dr. Moskalev.

Alex Zhavoronkov, CEO of InSilico Medicine, puts this exciting SAB addition into context,
“Aging lies at the core of the many global problems and there is an urgent need to extend the healthy productive longevity of the aging population while staying within the regulatory and ethical frameworks and boundaries and implement novel business models that will boost the confidence of the many industry stakeholders. The addition of these three world-class experts to our SAB strengthens our ability to develop new approaches to screening for drugs that may help delay the aging processes or repair the age-associated damage. Our approach to applied aging research stems from many years of cancer research and personalized medicine and some of the tissue profiling and drug selection methods are already employed in clinical research.”

On top of this, InSilico Medicine recently announced to the public about OncoFinder, its novel algorithm that will streamline the transcriptome analysis process.

09.09.2014

InSilico Medicine CEO to present at Oxford University

BALTIMORE, September 9, 2014 – Next week on September 15th, Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of InSilico Medicine, will present at the 21st Century Medicine Forum: Big Data Science in Medicine at the Martin Wood Lecture Theater, Oxford University, Physics Department. The title of his talk is “Occam’s razor in drug discovery for aging and cancer: in search for universal and personalized geroprotector regiments”. The event is free to attend and seeks to hasten progress of approaches to aging. Notable individuals such as Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Foundation will also be present to speak.

With regards to aging and this congress, Alex comments, “Aging is a complex multifactorial process with many intertwined cause and effect relationships that are still poorly understood and we need novel approaches for big data analysis to start making the first steps towards slowing down the pathologic age-related processes and repairing the accumulated damage. One of our goals is to evaluate the possible geroprotective effects of the currently approved or OTC drugs with known effects on the human cells and tissues, clinical, adverse effects and toxicity data to find combinations that will work on the population level and develop methods to personalize the regiments. This conference provides a perfect platform to discuss some of our early results before presenting them at the much larger conference in Basel, Switzerland later this month.”

This event serves as an example of the widespread and growing interest in aging prevention applications. Not only is the research community involvement increasing, but venture capitalists, top businesspeople, and well-established companies are all recognizing its future impact.

###

For more information, visit http://www.bigdatamed.org/.

09.08.2014

InSilico Medicine salutes Calico and AbbVie partnership, paves way for Basel conference

BALTIMORE, September 8, 2014 – AbbVie and Google-backed Calico announced yesterday that they will co-invest up to $1.5 billion to create a leading R&D facility focused on aging and age-related diseases, including neurodegeneration and cancer. This center will be located in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the amalgamation of the two companies serves as a trailblazer for similar research teams dedicated to eradicating aging and age-related diseases.

Aging research has long been regarded by the pharmaceutical industry as a subject of controversy associated with failed expectations, ineffective remedies, and blatantly false claims. However, the explosion of the research and clinical data, fueled by the drop in sequencing costs and technology convergence, has led to the emergence of projects with credible business models and approaches targeting both the age-related diseases as well as the aging-associated processes. Advances in aging biomarkers and in silico drug screening methods may soon enable the pharmaceutical industry to revisit their business models and reshape the regulatory frameworks.

InSilico Medicine, Inc. is thrilled about this new collaboration and its innovative potential. “InSilico Medicine, Inc. has developed several methods for geroprotector and geroprotector combination discovery and screening that are undergoing pre-clinical validation with multiple publications out, in review, and in the pipeline. We must thank Google for paving the way and setting the trend. After they got involved in this field, it gained a lot of credibility. In our opinion it is not a competitor, it is a bulldozer, which will pave the way for the many innovative companies like us.” InSilico Medicine CEO, Alex Zhavoronkov, says. “We salute Calico and AbbVie for spearheading the revolution in aging drug discovery and setting the example for other pharmaceutical companies to follow. These are fantastic news for InSilico Medicine, Inc., Human Longevity, Inc., Retrotope, Pathway Pharmaceuticals and many other companies pursuing age-related diseases and aging itself.”

With the MipTec 2014 conference in such close proximity to this notable collaboration, there is a great deal excitement for the experts, industries, and enthusiasts of aging therapies. The conference will host exceptional speakers, elaborate forums, and a variety of sponsors and exhibitors all dedicated to practical applications of aging. The conference serves as a bridge for scientists and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to discover the potential for drug screening and discovery platforms for age-related disease. As more companies such as Calico and AbbVie continue to enter the field of aging research, forums like MipTec will increase in popularity and unite partners from a large variety of organizations on an international scale.

###

More information on MipTec 2014 can be found at http://www.agingpharma.org/.

09.03.2014

InSilico Medicine to present GeroScopeTM at the FEBS-EMBO 2014 Conference

BALTIMORE, September 3, 2014 – InSilico Medicine’s Director of Aging Research, Alexander Aliper, is able to present the company’s new technology and platform, GeroScopeTM, to a diverse group of attendees at the FEBS-EMBO conference. This will mark the first presentation of GeroScopeTM to the public. It is a system for evaluating the age-related changes in the tissue of humans and other model organisms, and furthermore predicts the geroprotective efficacy of a multitude of drugs with known molecular targets. The conference program and poster sessions will allow delegates to learn more about its functionality. InSilico Medicine’s poster will elaborate on the drug screening process and signaling pathway activation drift in human fibroblasts in normal aging as well as progerias.

The FEBS-EMBO conference is a joint meeting hosted by the French Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (SFBBM). This meeting not only marks the anniversaries of these three organizations, but also the first meeting joining the FEBS and EMBO. Alex Zhavoronkov, CEO, comments on this event, “As 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of FEBS and EMBO, and the centennial of the SFBBM, we are happy to have several members of our team and partner organizations presenting their results at the historic FEBS-EMBO conference. It is a perfect venue to discuss the progress of our company, find collaborators and possibly recruit more brilliant scientists to join our growing international team. Most of InSilico Medicine’s team worked together long before the company was formed, creating its strong foundation. Our technology is held to a high standard, and we ensure recruitment of scientists of great relevance and talent to avoid uncontrolled, rapid expansion. Solving aging is a difficult task and will require a concerted multinational and multidisciplinary effort. FEBS-EMBO is a perfect platform to achieve these goals.”

###

The FEBS-EMBO conference is currently in session. More information can be seen at http://www.febs-embo2014.org/.

08.21.2014

OncoFinder, a new algorithm for minimizing errors in high-throughput transcriptome analysis

BALTIMORE, August 21, 2014 – InSilico Medicine, a Baltimore-based company dedicated to aging interventions and addressing the challenges of a rapidly aging population, proposes a new concept, OncoFinder, for signalome-wide pathway analysis. This new method allows for accurate and robust cross-platform analysis of gene expression data obtained using high-throughput techniques.

The original research, published in the journal Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, shows that the OncoFinder method significantly reduces errors introduced by transcriptome-wide experimental techniques. Scientists compared gene expression data for the same biological samples obtained by both next generation sequencing (NGS) and microarray methods, finding that these different techniques have almost no correlation between the gene expression values for all datasets analysed. In contrast, when the OncoFinder algorithm is applied to the data, a clear correlation between next generation sequencing and microarray gene expression datasets was seen.

“For several years the potential for the use of gene expression data in research and clinical applications has been underappreciated due to the inconsistency of the data coming from the various types of equipment. There is just too much variation and complexity when comparing the massive number of individual genes. But when this complexity is reduced and the gene expression is mapped onto signalling pathways, we can evaluate the pathway activation drift and analyse the changes and transitions much more effectively. The OncoFinder algorithm enables scientists to characterise the functional states of transcriptomes more accurately than before and we hope that this will become a method of choice in genetics, physiology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of Insilico Medicine and co-author of the study.

logo_prweb

07.10.2014

DKV Sponsors Forum on Commercialising Longevity Research; Brings Together Scientists, Investors, Entrepreneurs and Celebrities

LONDON, July 10, 2014 – Deep Knowledge Ventures last week sponsored the inaugural 21st Century Medicine Forum on ‘Commercialising Longevity Research’ and welcomed a host of London-based investors, scientists and entrepreneurs to the London Bioscience Innovation Center for the event, organised by the UK’s Biogerontology Research Foundation and Aging Analytics Ltd. The meeting highlighted the need for both philanthropic support and investment in translational research for age-related disease, as well as the crucial role of social awareness of advances in regenerative and preventative medicine. This point was well made by attending actress, campaigner and international model, Katya Elizarova, who said:

“It’s clear that the most important thing is to support projects for preventing aging. If researchers are clever enough to develop methods to prevent age-related damage accumulating, it’s much more likely that they will have an ability to treat with success”, adding, “If I, as a media person, can increase the awareness of what you are doing here today and involve as many people as I can, then I shall do it.”

The evening was marked by the announcement that former Chairman of the International Employee Benefits Association and pensions industry expert Geoffrey Furlonger is to join Aging Analytics as its new CEO. Deep Knowledge Ventures Senior Partner Dmitry Kaminskiy made the announcement during his talk on Impact Investment in Regenerative Medicine and highlighted Aging Analytics success in deploying its unique investor decision support software, VITAL (Validating Investment Tool for Advancing Life Sciences) and the publication of its first report, ‘Investing in Regenerative Medicine: Technology and Market Outlook’. Participants of the forum were handed out free copies of the report at the event. Introducing Geoffrey, Dmitry noted that under his leadership we could expect to see Aging Analytics draw attention to the opportunities for investment in the regenerative medicine industry that the pensions and life insurance industries have, as well as the significant use for the research the company could now generate.

Deep Knowledge Ventures investment remit includes artificial intelligence research and robotics, as well as longevity related biotechnology. On the subject of investment in pioneering technologies

Mr Kaminskiy said: “According to our estimates we are at an exciting historical point – even with a relatively small amount of investment – hundreds of millions of dollars – but with well-organized and inspired teams, it’s possible to accelerate the exponential growth in science and medicine.
Our first joint task is now to create a convenient format for investing in this field for conventional investors, who got used to think in very narrow categories. But we need to go beyond this and change the paradigm. Investors in this field stand to gain more valuable results than profit alone. The logic is effective: in case of successful investments, they automatically get direct access to the actual technologies of personalized medicine and life prolongation for themselves and their families. What other business could be better? When you prolong life and still earn a lot of money on this.

This is the same for all stakeholders. People engaged in charity get closer to the technologies of personalized medicine. Investors get even closer as they make money on it. In the forefront though are the entrepreneurs, who invest not only money – but also invest their infrastructure resources, time, expertise and managerial talent.

I estimate that the growth of the market for regenerative medicine is in a situation similar to the beginning of DotCom boom in the late 1990s. We can see it through big investments – Google with antiaging project – Calico, IBM with Watson, famous startup Human Longevity and even Lockheed Martin with their personalized medicine project.

Personally, my opinion is that the most basic prospects of the 21st century are at the intersection of biotechnology, personalized medicine and artificial intelligence. I think, that next fundamental task in artificial intelligence development is to exempt progressive businessmen from the routine work of making money.

I foresee that progressive businessmen will begin to use artificial intelligence (AI) and that it will give them a fundamental advantage over traditional businesses. I’m absolutely sure that in 5, maximum 10 years the average oligarch will not compare the length of ocean yachts or popularity of their football clubs, but will compare powers of their financial AI, access to technologies of personalized medicine and their level of ability to prolong their own lives.”

Speakers during the event included Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov, CEO of Deep Knowledge Ventures portfolio company InSilico Medicine, who explained “By bringing together class-leading researchers, pensions experts, financial heavyweights and science communicators at meetings like this, we hope to facilitate collaboration across disciplines and produce the next generation of projects that will take longevity science from the bench to the clinic”. InSilico Medicine recently announced that Dr Charles Cantor, former Director of the Human Genome Project, had been appointed Chairman of their scientific advisory board, placing the company at the vanguard of efforts to apply bioinformatics to longevity research. Dr. Zhavoronkov also made available complementary copies of his new book ‘The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will Transform the Global Economy’.

Participants of the event were extended invitations to attend the International Symposium on Geroprotectors meeting on ‘Practical Applications of Ageing Research for Drug Discovery’, at the MipTEC conference in Basel, Switzerland September 23rd – 24th 2014.

logo_prweb

07.02.2014

Pharmaceutical Companies to Convene in Basel, Switzerland in September to Explore the Practical Applications of Aging Research for Drug Discovery

BALTIMORE, July 2, 2014 – Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of InSilico Medicine, Inc. and Bhupinder Bhullar, PhD, the laboratory director of the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research (NIBR) are co-organizing the International Symposium on Geroprotectors: Practical Applications of Aging Research for Drug Discovery, at MipTec, in Basel, Switzerland on September 23-24th. The industry-sponsored conference with several parallel forums is free to attend.

With over 3,000 delegates from pharmaceutical companies, hundreds of exhibitors, poster presentations and speakers, MipTec is the largest annual drug discovery conference in Europe. The conference theme for 2014 is “Translating Science into Drugs.” It is the first time that the conference will feature the forum on aging research.

“Aging research has long been regarded by the pharmaceutical industry as a subject of controversy associated with failed expectations, ineffective remedies, and blatantly false claims. However, the explosion of the research and clinical data fueled by the drop in sequencing costs and technology convergence has led to the emergence of projects with credible business models and approaches targeting both the age-related diseases as well as the aging-associated processes. Advances in aging biomarkers and in silico drug screening methods may soon enable the pharmaceutical industry to revisit their business models and reshape the regulatory frameworks. I am happy to see that the most reputable pharmaceutical companies in the world are joining the difficult but noble quest to translate aging research into clinical practice,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD.

The aging forum will feature top academic and industry thought leaders in aging research, whose work is ready for or nearing clinical adoption. Keynote speakers at the conference include Dr. Jörg Reinhardt, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Novartis AG; Prof. Patrick Aebischer, President, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL); and Dr. Lorenz Mayr, Vice President, Reagents & Assay Development, AstraZeneca Ltd. More information is available at http://www.AgingPharma.com.

 logo_prweb

06.04.2014

The Former Head of the Human Genome Project Joins InSilico Medicine, Inc. in the War on Aging as the Chair of the SAB

BALTIMORE, June 4, 2014 – InSilico Medicine, Inc. announced today that Charles Cantor, Ph.D. will chair its Scientific Advisory Board.

Dr. Cantor, one of the leaders of the Human Genome Project, has published more than 400 peer-reviewed articles, authored and co-authored more than 50 U.S. and international patents. He is also an author of the first genomics textbook, “Genomics: The Science and Technology of the Human Genome Project” and the three-volume textbook “Biophysical Chemistry”.

“Professor Cantor’s discoveries and leadership are already helping save lives and improve human health span. What is less known is his interest in areas related to aging including the complex and multi-year research projects in isotopically-fortified organic compounds and advanced diagnostics using the cell-free nucleic acids. He is the role model for the many research scientists aspiring to utilize resources available in the private sector, accelerate scientific research without the many formal constraints and budgetary limitations of academia and turn their discoveries into practical projects. We are honored to have Charles join our advisory board”, said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Dr. Cantor is the co-founder of Sequenom, Inc, a company engaged in non-invasive prenatal diagnostics and co-founder of Retrotope, a company developing isotopically-fortified organic compounds to bolster stress resistance and combat age-related diseases and acts as a consultant for several companies within the biotechnology industry. He is professor emeritus at the Boston University, distinguished adjunct professor at the University of California Irvine and adjunct professor at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and at Scripps Research Institute. Dr. Cantor was previously the chair and professor of the department of biomedical engineering and biophysics, and director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at Boston University, and his research laboratory remains active.

“Aging is one of the most pressing problems facing the economies of the developed countries and there is an urgent need for new ways to increase productive longevity and screening the known drugs for their geroprotective properties and personalizing anti-cancer and aging-suppressive regiments using genetic and epigenetic analysis is one of the low hanging fruits in applied aging research. I am pleased to join the SAB of this international team dedicated to develop working solutions for both aging and age-related diseases”, said Charles Cantor, PhD, chair of the Science Advisory Board of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Dr. Cantor was the chairman of Genetics and Development at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, and Professor of Molecular Biology, University of California, Berkeley.

He earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry at Columbia College, and his doctorate at the University of California Berkeley.

About InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Insilico Medicine, Inc. is a Baltimore-based bioinformatics and drug discovery company specializing in cancer and aging research and personalized medicine in age-related diseases. The company is developing models and softwares to predict the efficacy of the various targeted drugs in oncology and extrapolated these methods to evaluate the possible geroprotective properties of the many drugs with known molecular targets. The mission of InSilico Medicine is to find working solutions to treat, cure and prevent age-related diseases and aging itself through excellence in knowledge management, machine learning and bioinformatics, relentless pursuit for new drug, omics and clinical outcomes data, development of reliable in silico drug screening methods, novel validation approaches and strong international partnerships in personalized medicine. This mission will be achieved within the regulatory frameworks as well as the legal and ethical boundaries and by working with the outstanding scientists, academic and medical institutions and pharmaceutical companies of impeccable credibility. For more information please visithttp://www.InSilicoMedicine.com 

Press release at Reuters.com

Reuters

05.30.2014

Professor Bud Mishra, PhD Joins the Science Advisory Board of InSilico Medicine Engaged in Aging Research for Drug Discovery

BALTIMORE, May 30, 2014 – InSilico Medicine, Inc, engaged in cancer and aging research for drug discovery and developing personalized approaches to extending productive longevity is proud to announce the addition of Prof. Bud Mishra to its board of scientific advisors.

“Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov is a fascinating young scientist, seriously engaged in modeling the future of aging and various diseases that accompany it. He has assembled a dream team, especially with a leading visionary, Dr. Charles Cantor, who has “disrupted” the way we think about biology, biotechnology and bioinformatics. With a group like this, I hope to engage in a collective ‘head-banging’ against amazingly challenging biomedical problems – using some of the most advanced science and technologies”, said professor Bud Mishra.

“It is a pleasure to be involved in this innovative enterprise that can potentially really optimize individual medical care. I look forward to working with some of the outstanding participants in this endeavor. In particular I have long hoped for an opportunity to do something direct with bud Mishra and now that he has also joined the SAB of Insilico Medicine we have a forum to promote brain storming and interactions”, said Dr. Charles Cantor, a professor at Boston University, the former director of the Human Genome Project with the Department of Energy and the chair of the science advisory board of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

Prof. Bhubaneswar (Bud) Mishra is a professor of computer science and mathematics at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, professor of human genetics at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and a professor of cell biology at NYU School of Medicine. He founded the NYU/Courant Bioinformatics Group, a multi-disciplinary group working on research at the interface of computer science, applied mathematics and biology. His primary research subfield is “applied algorithmics,” but has ranged more generally from compilers, algorithms and complexity, logic, and algebra to robotics, finance, Internet, and biology.

Dr. Mishra published over three hundred high-impact publications on subjects ranging from mathematics, computer science and robotics to causality of cancer and genetics. His works were cited over five thousand times by other scientists and led to the many successful businesses and practical implementations.

“The sole fact that computer science juggernauts like Dr. Bud Mishra, whose research fuelled the computer, the Internet and the genomics revolutions are now working on aging research gives me a lot of hope for the future. These luminaries are creating the new level of abstraction on top of the laboratory science and using the rapidly expanding knowledge base to find practical applications that may rapidly translate into clinical practice. Our goal is to prove to the academic community, pharmaceutical companies, regulators and policy makers that it is possible to significantly streamline aging research for drug repurposing, drug discovery and personalization. Extending productive longevity is no longer a dream, but a clearly achievable objective”, said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

 Press release at MarketWatch.com

Market Watch

05.20.2014

InSilico Medicine Opens Office at the Emerging Technology Centers (ETC) at Johns Hopkins University Eastern Campus

Baltimore, May 20, 2014 – InSilico Medicine, Inc, the aging and longevity bioinformatics and drug discovery company, today announced the opening of its office in Baltimore within the Emerging Technology Centers (ETC) at Johns Hopkins University Eastern Campus.

InSilico Medicine, Inc is a Baltimore-based bioinformatics and drug discovery company specializing in cancer, aging research and personalized medicine in age-related diseases. The company developed methods and software tools to predict the effectiveness of the various targeted drugs in oncology and extrapolated these methods to evaluate the possible geroprotective properties of the many drugs with known molecular targets. The mission of InSilico Medicine is to find working solutions to treat, cure and prevent age-related diseases and aging itself through excellence in knowledge management, machine learning and bioinformatics, relentless pursuit for new drug, omics and clinical outcomes data, development of reliable in silico drug screening methods, novel validation approaches and strong international partnerships in personalized medicine.

“The state of the whole area of biomedical sciences today resembles that of the dawn of the personal computing in the 80’s or Internet in the 90’s. And as some of the discoveries transition from the laboratory into clinical practice and mainstream use, Baltimore may eclipse Silicon Valley. Baltimore is one of the few rapidly regenerating and developing cities with highly qualified labor and cost-effective infrastructure and we are proud to join this thriving community. ETC allows the innovative companies to develop within the Johns Hopkins ecosystem and move fast into the emerging areas of science and technology while absorbing the culture of excellence,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, CEO of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

To participate in the rapidly growing science and technology hub in Baltimore and to take advantage of the innovation-friendly environment developed by the community of the top industry captains, InSilico Medicine selected the Emerging Technology Centers at Johns Hopkins Eastern Campus as the optimal location for its research and development operations. This location provides access to thousands of highly educated bioinformatics professionals and interns to work on the highly-ambitious high-impact projects.

“We are extremely excited to welcome Insilico Medicine as an ETC portfolio company,” said Deborah Tillett, ETC’s President. “Their amazing research in productive longevity promises to change the future for all of us; they are a great addition to ETC and the City,” she concluded.

“Proximity to the major academic institutions like the Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Medicine, National Institute on Aging and University of Maryland will allow us to hire the recent graduates and interns as well as collaborate with some of the world’s most advanced geneticists, bioinformaticians and computer scientists. We aim to be a driver of change in medicine embracing the concept of productive longevity and shifting the paradigms from treatment to personalized prevention. Our approach to evaluating the ability of drugs to slow down the age-related processes and possibly repair the accumulated damage is unique and we would be very proud if it becomes one of the many breakthroughs originating from this Mecca of biomedicine”, said Qingsong Zhu, PhD, COO of InSilico Medicine, Inc.

“Many things are aligned in Baltimore to propel innovative start-up companies in healthcare. Access to world-class researchers and talent in biomedicine, technology and healthcare here in Maryland is unparalleled. If you couple that intellectual asset with a growing entrepreneurial base, a robust investment community, and the active involvement of large prominent institutions like the Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Medicine, BioHealth Innovation, and Northrop Grumman, as seen in the recent successful launch of DreamIT Health Baltimore, Baltimore’s first health accelerator, you start to see the initial sparks to what will undoubtedly lead to an explosion of innovations. We already see those sparks developing rapidly and InSilico Medicine is a testament to the growing prominence of Baltimore for innovative international companies. Its aim of combating cancer and aging through the use of genomics and novel bioinformatics comes at a very exciting and opportune time,” states Benjamin Seo, a Partner at emocha Mobile Health Inc. – a company, spun-out of technology developed at Johns Hopkins, offering a mobile health platform for remote patient management on a global scale.

Full press release at StreetInsider.com 

Street Insider

04.09.2014

Insilico Medicine, Inc. announces the appointment of cancer genomics expert Dr. Qingsong Zhu to the position of Chief Operating Officer

BALTIMORE, Apr 09, 2014 – Today Insilico Medicine, Inc., a Baltimore-based company using advances in genomics to discover new therapies to target aging and age-related diseases, announced the appointment of cancer genomics expert Dr. Qingsong Zhu to the position of Chief Operating Officer (COO).

Dr. Zhu holds a bachelors degree in biology from the Beijing Forestry University in Beijing. He obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry under Dr. Karl Kramer and Dr. Subaratnam Muthurishnan from Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas US where his research focused on insect genome sequencing, annotation and new gene identification. Dr. Zhu spent seven years as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University where he worked with Dr. Nancy Davidson in the breast cancer program and Dr. Robert Arceci in pediatric oncology. He was experienced in biomarker identification and drug development using both microarray and next generation sequencing techniques. Dr. Zhu has a broad professional network in the US and internationally and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

Insilico Medicine, Inc. holds an exclusive license to drug discoveries made using Hong Kong based Pathway Pharmaceuticals’ OncoFINDER tool, which predicts drug efficacy through a proprietary gene expression analysis algorithm. Dr. Qingsong Zhu will be responsible for operations and drug discovery research initiatives. He has over 15 years of experience in genomics with an emphasis on bioinformatics and the use of microarray and next generation sequencing (NGS) in cancer research. He has been involved in the identification of several novel drug targets and preclinical development programs. In addition, he has over three years experience managing clinical trials.

His latest entrepreneurial endeavors focused on improving the early diagnosis and personalized treatment of cancer and other diseases. He published his research in reputable peer-reviewed journals including Nature and as the first author in PNAS and Bioinformatics.

“The capabilities of drug discovery and personalized medicine companies are no longer constrained by the ability to afford and operate expensive sequencing equipment, but by the ability to interpret the data, make connections and extract valuable knowledge. Building on years of research in bioinformatics and equipped with powerful resources like the OncoFINDER and GeroScope, Insilico Medicine has set itself the most challenging of goals possible in biomedical research: finding drugs that combat age-related diseases and even aging itself. I am very excited to join this fast-paced and ambitious company and contribute to the revolution in cancer and aging research”, said Qingsong Zhu, PhD, Chief Operating Officer of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

Insilico Medicine, Inc. joins Google Ventures’s Calico and Craig Venter’s Human Longevity. Inc. in the hunt for novel solutions to age-related disease.

Dr Zhu notes that “Whilst other recently announced companies plan to use Big Data to find solutions for healthy aging without clearly defining the methods, Insilico Medicine, Inc has a very specific approach to high-throughput in silico drug discovery, screening and ranking of the many potential drugs and drug combinations.”

“We are very excited about Dr. Zhu joining our team. He spent many years working at the top cancer lane at Johns Hopkins Medicine as well as an independent consultant on application of NGS to diagnostic and personalized medicine. His philosophy of combining corporate goals with academic excellence is aligned with the spirit of Insilico Medicine, Inc. Dr. Zhu will coordinate the internal team as well as the sponsored research projects and collaborations with our partners. Together we will relentlessly pursue the ambitious goals of the company to discover new drugs and drug combinations to combat age-related diseases and develop new methods for tailoring drug regiments of the individual patients”, commented Professor Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, Chief Executive Officer of Insilico Medicine, Inc.

Press release at MarketWatch.com

Market Watch

03.28.2014

Press About US: In Silico Medicine Opens US Office, Prepares to Launch Drug Discovery Software for Aging Research Market

Requires subscription to GenomeWeb.

GenomeWeb Insilico

03.06.2014

InSilico Medicine Inc. Launches in the US to Use Advances in Information Technology to Combat Aging and Age-related Diseases

BALTIMORE,  March 6, 2014 – In Silico Medicine Inc, developing novel computer-assisted methods for drug discovery in aging research, has officially launched in the US. InSilico Medicine draws on years of research and software development expertise of its partner, Pathway Pharmaceuticals in Hong Kong, which employs its state of the art OncoFinder platform to select and rate personalized cancer therapies, and identify new drug candidates in oncology.

Population aging is one of the major internal threats to the economies, cultures and social structures in developed countries. Increasing productive longevity of the working population may not only be the major new source of economic growth, but the only altruistic way to save the debt-laden economies from collapsing. And while aging is a very complex multifactorial process that cannot be stopped or reversed by a simple combination of drugs, the pharmaceutical industry needs a platform to screen and predict the effectiveness of possible aging-suppressive drugs in a high-throughput environment to at least slow some of the aging processes

One of the reasons why pharmaceutical companies failed to develop business models for increasing productive human longevity is because human lifespans are much longer than that of the many model organisms and it takes decades to evaluate the effects of any drug. Some of the known drugs have been on the market for many decades and only recently scientists started finding clues to their oncoprotective, cardioprotective and geroprotective effects. Moreover, many drugs that work on model organisms including mice do not have the same effects in humans. There is an urgent need for intelligent systems that will cost-effectively predict the effectiveness of the many drugs on the population, but also on the individual levels.

“We built our platform on years of experience of a large international team who specialize in using gene expression data from individual patient’s tumor to predict the effectiveness of targeted compounds and improve clinical decision making. We are reinventing this system for drug discovery in cancer and aging,” said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, the CEO of In Silico Medicine. “The recent wave of startups looking to employ big data to find solutions for aging, including the Google’s Calico and Human Longevity, should give everyone hope that we may see the time when both the medical institutions and pharmaceutical companies will start saving lives so every human being on the planet will benefit.”

Some of the ideas behind the company’s drug discovery platforms for both cancer and aging are rather simple: analyze the genetic and epigenetic profiles of young and normal cells, run computer simulations to see what drugs make the old or malignant cell get as close to the norm as possible and then validate the results on human cells and model organisms. The same approach may be employed to personalize the drug regimen for individual patients. The core expertise of In Silico Medicine is in all-inclusive gene expression analysis and development of various algorithms that minimize the difference between the “young” and “old” signaling pathway activation profiles, and they are actively adding new modules that can be used with the drug databases. These include microRNA, methylation and proteomics modules among others.

Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 0.13.20

Read this press release at Reuters

Team

Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD

Chief Executive Officer

Prior to co-founding In Silico Medicine Dr. Zhavoronkov held numerous positions in academia as well as the senior management positions in both IT and biotechnology private and publicly-traded companies in Canada, USA, Germany, Russia and China.

He started his career in telecommunications semiconductors the product marketing engineer with PMC-Sierra (Nasdaq:PMCS) in Burnaby, then progressed from the business manager of desktop business unit to the director of Central and Eastern Europe at ATI Technologies (Nasdaq: AMD), a publicly- traded in computer graphics acquired by AMD.

He served as the CEO of Mediox, Inc, the developer of the many popular multimedia interactive display devices and as the director of GTCBio, a biotechnology conference management company. Together with scientists from Canada, Russia and the US, he co-founded the First Oncology Research and Advisory Center, a personalized medicine organization providing contract research services to oncologists interested in gene expression and activated signaling pathway analysis and predicted effectiveness of targeted drugs to improve clinical decision making in oncology. The company was later acquired by Pathway Pharmaceuticals, Limited in Hong Kong.

Dr. Zhavoronkov is the adjunct professor of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. He is a member of the editorial boards of Drug Discovery International and Frontiers in Molecular Diagnostics journals. He is the author of over thirty research articles, analytical reports, white papers and several books including the biotechnology bestseller “The Ageless Generation: How biomedical advances will transform the global economy”.

 

Qingsong Zhu, PhD

Chief Operating Officer

Dr. Qingsong Zhu is responsible for In Silico Medicine, Inc operations and drug discovery research initiatives. He has over 15 years of experience in genomics research with the emphasis on bioinformatics and the use of microarray and next generation sequencing (NGS) in cancer research and drug target identification and evaluation using in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, he has over three years of clinical trials experience. His latest entrepreneurial endeavors focused on improving the early diagnosis and personalized treatment of cancer and other diseases.

Dr. Zhu spent six years as the post doctoral research associate in the leading labs at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. He published extensively in reputable peer-reviewed journals including Nature and as the first author in PNAS and Bioinformatics.

Dr Zhu holds the bachelor degree in biology from the Beijing Forestry University in Beijing, a masters degree in biochemistry and a Ph.D. degree from the Kansas State University in Manhattan, US. He obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry under Dr. Karl Kramer and Dr. Subaratnam Muthurishnan from Kansas State University where his research focused on insect genome sequencing, annotation and new gene identification. He received his postdoctoral training in the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University. He worked with Dr. Nancy Davidson in the breast cancer program and Dr. Robert Arceci in pediatric oncology. He was experienced in biomarker identification and drug development using both microarray and next generation sequencing techniques. Dr. Zhu has a broad professional network in the US and internationally and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

 

Evgeny Makarev, PhD

_meDirector of Aging Research

Dr. Evgeny Makarev is a unique multidisciplinary specialist who has a deep knowledge of biology along with expertise in bioinformatics, statistical analysis, and programming. Dr. Makarev joins the In Silico Medicine team as an ambitious scientist aiming to achieve significant progress in aging research. Having over ten years of experience in regenerative biology as well as stem cell and cancer research, he is focused to apply system biology approach to tackle aging. He is interested in applying computational biology methodology to aging research in order to effectively analyze the aging-related information and to turn the results of this analysis into a powerful tool that will extend human life using new and innovative personalized drugs and supplements.

Dr. Makarev completed his postdoctoral training at the National Institutes of Health (NICHD) in Bethesda where Dr. Makarev conducted stem cell research using the small intestine as a model, identified a new stem cell marker, elaborated stem cell niche in intestine, and published the paper describing his discoveries, significantly contributing to stem cell research.

Dr. Makarev earned his bachelor and master degrees in Cell Biology from one of the top European schools, Moscow State University. Upon graduation he started pioneering research in Professor Mitashov’s Laboratory of Regenerative Studies at the Institute of Development Biology, Moscow. Dr. Makarev published a series of influential papers on eye regeneration research and demonstrated convergence between regeneration and normal development for the first time. Later, he teamed up with Prof. Tsonis, Director of Center for Tissue Regeneration & Engineering at Dayton, Ohio (TREND). Together, they identified critical biomarkers of regeneration, sequenced de novo, and established the role of miRNA in regeneration.

 

Research and Development Team

In Silico Medicine is built on the scientific platform constructed by over a hundred scientists internationally. It draws on the research and software development expertise of its partner, Pathway Pharmaceuticals in Hong Kong. The companies share management and the Scientific Advisory Board.

The company is actively hiring and we are actively searching for experts in bioinformatics in the areas of:

  • Transcriptome, microRNA and epigenetic analysis
  • Molecular pathway analysis
  • Data mining
  • Management of large curated drug databases

 

Anton Buzdin, PhD, DSc

Prof. Anton Buzdin, PhD, Doctor of Sciences, is the head of the Group for Genomic Analysis of Cell Signaling Systems at the Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry in Moscow. He also supervises a Laboratory of Bioinformatics at the Federal Clinical Research Center for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology in Moscow and works as the invited professor at the Federal Medico-Biological Agency of Russia. He is also a director of the First Oncology Research and Advisory Center, a Russia-based innovative company aimed at the application of research in bioinformatics to clinical medicine.

His primary research interests are focused on genomics, molecular genetics and bioinformatics, translation medicine, include systems biology of carcinogenesis, high-throughput analysis of biological and biomedical information and finding molecular targets for the development of new drugs.

He was graduated from Lomonosov Moscow State University at 1999. Dr. Buzdin was acknowledged by a Golden Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences, by a Medal of the Academia Europaea, by a Medal of the Timofeev-Ressovsky International Society of Genetics and by many other awards. Mr. Buzdin is author of more than 70 scientific works.

 

Sergey Roumiantsev, MD, PhD, DSc

Prof. Sergey A. Roumiantsev, MD, PhD, DSc, is the Head of Research and Education programs at the Federal Clinical Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, and a Professor at the Russian National Research Medical University(Department of Oncology and Hematology, Pediatric Faculty). He also heads the faculty of regenerative and translational medicine at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.

He has more than 160 scientific publications in medical journals.

His primary research interests include molecular diagnostics, regenerative medicine, immunobiology and immunopharmacology, biology of neoplastic growth, properties of leukemic and normal blood and bone marrow cells, normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, stem cell banking, angiogenesis, oncogenetic, target therapy, and blood doping.

 

Nikolay Borisov, PhD, DSc

Head of Laboratory for Oncological Bioinformatics and Systems Biology of Cell Signaling Pathways, Federal Biophysical Center A.I. Burnazyan of Federal Biomedical Agency (Moscow).

Head of Department of Medical Physics, Biophysics and X-ray Planning in Institute of Professional Education, Federal Biophysical Center A.I. Burnazyan.

Graduate of Department of Biophysics, Radiation Physics and Ecology, National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (1996). Passed his doctoral internship (over 5 years) in Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, and IRSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

Collaborates with University College Dublin (Ireland) and Pittsburg University (USA).

Mr. Borisov is author of more than 80 works regarded to methods of computing mathematics in molecular oncology and radiation physics. Expert of International Atomic Energy Agency in medical physics and molecular oncology (2011). Was acknowledged by medal V.I.Korogodin “Life phenomenon” (2009). Honored by commendation of Biological Sciences Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences for studies of molecular-kinetik fundaments of blastomatosis with domain-oriented approach.

SAB

In Silico Medicine is built on the scientific platform constructed by over a hundred scientists internationally. It draws on the research and software development expertise of its partner, Pathway Pharmaceuticals in Hong Kong. The companies share management and the Scientific Advisory Board.

Scientific Advisory Board:

Charles Cantor, PhD (BU, Sequenom, Agena)

Charles Cantor is the former director of the Human Genome Project and is now the director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at Boston University. His research interests are human genome analysis, molecular genetics and genetic engineering. Dr. Cantor, in conjunction with David Schwartz, developed pulse field gel electrophoresis for very large molecules.

Among his current projects are the development of new methods for faster DNA sequencing, the development of a bacteria strain that will aid in environmental detoxification, and locating the genes for smell and taste. Cantor’s laboratory at Boston University has developed methods for separating large DNA molecules, for studying structural relationships in complex proteins and nucleic acids, and for sensitive detection of proteins and nucleic acids in a variety of settings.

Cantor serves as a consultant to more than 16 biotech firms, has published more than 400 peer reviewed articles, been granted 54 US patents, and co-authored a three-volume textbook on Biophysical Chemistry. He is also a co-founder and Director of Retrotope, a US-based company using heavier isotopes of carbon (C13) and hydrogen (deuterium) to stabilize essential compounds like amino acids, nucleic acids and lipids to target age-related diseases.


Bud Mishra, PhD (NYU/Cold Spring Harbor)

Bud Mishra is a professor of computer science and mathematics at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, professor of human genetics Mt Sinai School of Medicine, and a professor of cell biology at NYU School of Medicine. Bud has a degree in Physics from Utkal University, in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kharagpur, and MS and PhD degrees in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University. Bud is also a visiting scholar at CSHL’s Institute of Quantitative Biology, and an adjunct professor at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) in Mumbai, India. From 2001-04, he was a professor at the Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Lab (CSHL).

He has industrial experience in Computer Science (Tartan Laboratories, and ATTAP), Finance (Tudor Investment and PRF, LLC), Robotics and Biotechnology (Abraxis, OpGen, and Bioarrays/Immucor). He is editor of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, AMRX (Applied Mathematics Research Exchange) and Transactions on Systems Biology, and author of a textbook on algorithmic algebra and more than two hundred archived publications.

Bud’s current research is aimed at developing a genomics technology that will enable one to accurately analyze haplotypic data for large-scale human population studies. He has been working also on the evolution of multicellularity and its role in cancer.


Donald Small, MD/PhD (Johns Hopkins Medicine)

Donald Small is the director of pediatric oncology at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Dr. Small received his undergraduate, and then M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University in 1979 and 1985. His Ph.D. research was conducted with Bert Vogelstein in the Oncology Department and his postdoctoral research with Tom Kelly in the Molecular Biology and Genetics Department. He trained in pediatrics and pediatric hematology/oncology at Johns Hopkins and joined the faculty in 1990 where he moved up the ranks and is the Kyle Haydock Professor of Oncology with joint appointments in Pediatrics and Cellular and Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics. He has been the Director of Pediatric Oncology since 2006.

His laboratory was the first to clone the human FLT3 gene that is the most frequently mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and results in very poor chances of cure for these patients. They investigated its role in leukemia and were the first to discover drugs able to inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of FLT3. His laboratory showed that this class of drugs would preferentially kill leukemic cell lines and primary AML samples expressing mutant FLT3. Thus, this is one of the first examples of molecularly targeted therapy for cancer. They developed a high-throughput cell-based in vitro assay that enabled them to screen a large library of kinase inhibitors and find several with great potency and selectivity against FLT3. His group led the first clinical trials investigating the use of a FLT3 inhibitor in adult relapsed and refractory FLT3 mutant AML, and determined how to best combine these drugs with chemotherapy. They also helped design the first pediatric trials of FLT3 inhibitors in pediatric AML and infant ALL.

His lab continues to study the process of leukemic transformation and the role of FLT3 in leukemia stem cells through the generation of mouse models and by studying signaling changes in these cells.


Alexey Moskalev, PhD, DSc (MIPT)

Alexey Moskalev, DSc is Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology at the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Center of the Ural division of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also Professor at Syktyvkar State University.

Alex focuses on DNA repair and molecular mechanisms of aging. He earned his DSc in Biology at Syktyvkar State University.

His papers include Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB prolongs lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster, Radiation-induced lifespan alteration of Drosophila lines with genotype differences, Gadd45 proteins: Relevance to aging, longevity, and age-related pathologies, Pharmacological Inhibition of Phosphoinositide 3 and TOR Kinases Improves Survival of Drosophila melanogaster, Chronic gamma-irradiation effect on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan in generations of wild-type isogenic and heterogenic strains, and The role of DNA damage and repair in aging through the prism of Koch-like criteria.


Kristen Fortney, PhD (Stanford)

Kristen Fortney is a postdoctoral fellow of the Aging Research, Ellison Medical Foundation / American Federation for Aging Research at Stanford University. She received her PhD in Bioinformatics from the University of Toronto in 2012. Her current research interests are bioinformatics applied to human aging, especially as it applies to the genetics of human longevity. She is a member of the Stuart Kim Lab of the Stanford Department of Developmental Biology, whose long term goal is to “understand the process of growing old, and then try to slow down or reverse the aging process” by understanding the underlying clock for aging that dictates the rate at which normal aging occurs.


Michael Levitt, PhD (Stanford)

Michael Levitt received the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems”, together with Martin Karplus and Arieh Warshel, representing their advancement of chemistry through computer simulation.

Levitt was one of the first researchers to conduct molecular dynamics simulations of DNA and proteins and developed the first software for this purpose. He is currently well known for developing approaches to predict macromolecular structures. Dr. Levitt has served as a professor of structural biology at Stanford University since 1987 and is known for his work in computational biology. His background in computational modeling to understand protein folding processes and molecular interactions is directly applicable to aspects of aging research that Insilico Medicine addresses.

Dr. Levitt is Insilico Medicine’s latest Scientific Advisory Board addition in the pursuit of working interventions towards aging and aging-related disease. Levitt has served on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the following companies: Oplon Ltd, Cocrystal Discovery, StemRad, Ltd, and Cengent Therapeutics, Inc.

Publications

RECENT PUBLICATIONS:

SILENCING AML1-ETO GENE EXPRESSION LEADS TO SIMULTANEOUS ACTIVATION OF BOTH PRO-APOPTOTIC AND PROLIFERATION SIGNALING PV SPIRIN, TD LEBEDEV, NN ORLOVA, AS GORNOSTAEVA, MM PROKOFJEVA, NA NIKITENKO, SE DMITRIEV, AA BUZDIN, NM BORISOV, AM ALIPER, AV GARAZHA, PM RUBTSOV, C STOCKING AND VS PRASSOLOV LEUKEMIA (14 APRIL 2014) | DOI:10.1038/LEU.2014.130
HTTP://WWW.NATURE.COM/LEU/JOURNAL/VAOP/NCURRENT/FULL/LEU2014130A.HTML

SIGNALING PATHWAY CLOUD REGULATION FOR IN SILICO SCREENING AND RANKING OF THE POTENTIAL GEROPROTECTIVE DRUGS. ZHAVORONKOV A, BUZDIN AA, GARAZHA AV, BORISSOV NM AND MOSKALEV AA (2014) FRONT. GENET. 5:49. DOI: 10.3389/FGENE.2014.00049
HTTP://JOURNAL.FRONTIERSIN.ORG/JOURNAL/10.3389/FGENE.2014.00049/FULL

ONCOFINDER, A NEW METHOD FOR THE ANALYSIS OF INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PATHWAY ACTIVATION USING TRANSCRIPTOMIC DATA. ANTON A. BUZDIN, ALEX A. ZHAVORONKOV,MIKHAIL B. KORZINKIN, LARISA S. VENKOVA, ALEXANDER A. ZENIN, PHILIP YU. SMIRNOV AND NIKOLAY M. BORISOV
HTTP://JOURNAL.FRONTIERSIN.ORG/JOURNAL/10.3389/FGENE.2014.00055/FULL

SCIENTIFIC PAPERS:

CHARACTERISTIC PATTERNS OF MICRORNA EXPRESSION IN HUMAN BLADDER CANCER. ZABOLOTNEVA AA, ZHAVORONKOV A, GARAZHA AV, ROUMIANTSEV SA, BUZDIN AA. FRONT GENET. 2012;3:310.

EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPECIFIC PROTEIN CODING OPEN READING FRAME C11ORF72. BASKAEV KK, KHOLODENKO RV, MALAKHOVA GV, GAĬFULLIN NM, KORZENEVA EA, SUNTSOVA MV, BUZDINAA. BIOORG KHIM. 2013 MAR-APR;39(2):151-8.

TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF HUMAN-SPECIFIC SVA(F1) RETROTRANSPOSONS BY CIS-REGULATORY MAST2 SEQUENCES. ZABOLOTNEVA AA, BANTYSH O, SUNTSOVA MV, EFIMOVA N, MALAKHOVA GV, SCHUMANN GG, GAYFULLIN NM,BUZDIN AA. GENE. 2012 AUG 15;505(1):128-36. EPUB 2012 MAY 15.

NMETR: TECHNIQUE FOR FACILE RECOVERY OF HYPOMETHYLATION GENOMIC TAGS. BASKAEV K, GARAZHA A, GAIFULLIN N, SUNTSOVA MV, ZABOLOTNEVA AA, BUZDIN AA. GENE. 2012 APR 25;498(1):75-80. EPUB 2012 FEB 13.

EVOLUTIONARILY RECENT GROUPS OF TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS IN THE HUMAN GENOME. K.K. BASKAEV, A.A. BUZDIN (2011)

SUNTSOVA M, GOGVADZE EV, SALOZHIN S, GAIFULLIN N, EROSHKIN F, DMITRIEV SE, MARTYNOVA N, KULIKOV K, MALAKHOVA G, TUKHBATOVA G, BOLSHAKOV AP, GHILAROV D, GARAZHA A, ALIPER A, CANTOR CR, SOLOKHIN Y, ROUMIANTSEV S, BALABAN P, ZHAVORONKOV A, BUZDIN A. HUMAN-SPECIFIC ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL INSERT SERVES AS AN ENHANCER FOR THE SCHIZOPHRENIA-LINKED GENE PRODH. PROC NATL ACAD SCI U S A. 2013 NOV 26;110(48):19472-7. DOI: 10.1073/PNAS.1318172110.

HOW MANY ANTIVIRAL SMALL INTERFERING RNAS MAY BE ENCODED BY THE MAMMALIAN GENOMES? A. ZABOLOTNEVA, V. TKACHEV, F. FILATOV, A. BUZDIN (2010) BIOLOGY DIRECT 5: 62 DOI:10.1186/1745-6150-5-62

UNIQUE FUNCTIONS OF THE REPETITIVE TRANSCRIPTOME. G.G. SCHUMANN, E.V. GOGVADZE, M. OSANAI-FUTAHASHI, A. KUROKI, C. MÜNK, H. FUJIWARA, Z. IVICS, AND A.A. BUZDIN. (2010) INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, VOL. 285:115-88.

NOVEL STRONG TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTER FOR GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN GERM CELLS. KUZMIN D, GOGVADZE E, KHOLODENKO R, GRZELA DP, MITYAEV M, VINOGRADOVA T, KOPANTZEV E,MALAKHOVA G, SUNTSOVA M, SOKOV D, IVICS Z, BUZDIN A. (2010) BMC BIOTECHNOL. 2010 AUG 17;10(1):58.

ENHANCER ELEMENT POTENTIALLY INVOLVED IN HUMAN SURVIVIN GENE PROMOTER REGULATION IN LUNG CANCER CELL LINES. MITYAEV MV, KOPANTZEV EP, BUZDIN AA, VINOGRADOVA TV, SVERDLOV ED. (2010) BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSC). 2010 FEB;75(2):182-91.

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL INSERTS IN THE CONTEXT OF HUMAN GENOME EVOLUTION. A.A. BUZDIN (2010), RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 36(1): 35-43.

HIV-1 INFECTION INDUCES RETROTRANSPOSITION OF LINE-1 ELEMENTS. JONES RB, GARRISON KE, SONG H, BUZDIN A, ANWAR N, MEIKLEJOHN DA, NDHLOVU LC, NIXON DF, OSTROWSKI MA (2009) RETROVIROLOGY, 6(S2): P32.

NOVEL FAMILY OF HUMAN TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS FORMED DUE TO A FUSION OF THE FIRST EXON OF GENE MAST2 WITH RETROTRANSPOSON SVA. O.B. BANTYSH, A.A. BUZDIN (2009) BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSC).74(12):1709-1717.

RETROELEMENTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON GENOME EVOLUTION AND FUNCTIONING. GOGVADZE E., BUZDIN A. (2009) CMLS, CELL. MOL. LIFE SCI. AUG.2. HUMAN-SPECIFIC MODULATION OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY PROVIDED BY ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL INSERTS. E GOGVADZE, E STUKACHEVA, A BUZDIN, AND E SVERDLOV (2009) J.VIROL. 83(12): 6098-6105

MOLECULAR RECEPTORS OF TASTE AGENTS. D.A. GHILAROV, T.A. SAKHAROVA, A.A. BUZDIN. (2009) RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 35(1): 5-14.

FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF A PUTATIVE SP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR BINDING SITE IN THE SURVIVIN GENE PROMOTER. MITYAEV MV, KOPANTZEV EP, BUZDIN AA, VINOGRADOVA TV, SVERDLOV ED. BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSC). 2008 NOV;73(11):1183-91

E. GOGVADZE, C. BARBISAN, M.-H. LEBRUN AND A. BUZDIN (2007) TRIPARTITE CHIMERIC PSEUDOGENE FROM THE GENOME OF RICE BLAST FUNGUS MAGNAPORTHE GRISEA SUGGESTS DOUBLE TEMPLATE JUMPS DURING LONG INTERSPERSED NUCLEAR ELEMENT (LINE) REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION. BMC GENOMICS, 8(1):360.

A. BUZDIN (2007) HUMAN SPECIFIC ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRUSES. THESCIENTIFICWORLDJOURNAL, 7: 1848-1868.

BUZDIN A, GOGVADZE E, LEBRUN MH. (2007) CHIMERIC RETROGENES SUGGEST A ROLE FOR THE NUCLEOLUS IN LINE AMPLIFICATION. 581(16):2877-82. EPUB 2007 MAY

I. KHOLODENKO, R. KHOLODENKO, V. SOROKIN, A. TOLMAZOVA, O. SAZONOVA, A. BUZDIN (2007) ANTI-APOPTOTIC EFFECT OF RETINOIC ACID ON RETINAL PROGENITOR CELLS MEDIATED BY A PROTEIN KINASE A-DEPENDENT MECHANISM. CELL RESEARCH, 17(2):151-62.

BUZDIN A., KOVALSKAYA-ALEXANDROVA E., GOGVADZE E., SVERDLOV E. (2006) AT LEAST 50% OF HUMAN-SPECIFIC HERV-K (HML-2) LONG TERMINAL REPEATS SERVE IN VIVO AS ACTIVE PROMOTERS FOR HOST NONREPETITIVE DNA TRANSCRIPTION. J VIROL., 80(21):10752-62.

A. BUZDIN, E. KOVALSKAYA-ALEXANDROVA, E. GOGVADZE, E. SVERDLOV (2006) GREM, A TECHNIQUE FOR GENOME-WIDE ISOLATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PROMOTER ACTIVE REPEATS. NUCLEIC ACIDS RES., 34(9): E67.

I. V. KHOLODENKO, A. A. BUZDIN, R. V. KHOLODENKO, J. A. BIBIKOVA, V. F. SOROKIN, V. N. YARYGIN, AND E. D. SVERDLOV (2006) MOUSE RETINAL PROGENITOR CELL (RPC) COCULTIVATION WITH RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIAL CELL CULTURE AFFECTS FEATURES OF RPC DIFFERENTIATION. BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSCOW) 71(7):767-74.

KOVALSKAYA, E., BUZDIN, A., GOGVADZE, E., VINOGRADOVA, T., SVERDLOV, E.D. (2006) FUNCTIONAL HUMAN ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL LTR TRANSCRIPTION START SITES ARE LOCATED BETWEEN THE R AND U5 REGIONS. VIROLOGY, MAR 15; 346(2):373-378.

BUZDIN, A. (2006) TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS AND THEIR USE FOR TARGET SITE SPECIFIC GENE DELIVERY. CURRENT PHARMACOGENOMICS, MARCH; 4(1): 1-8.

GOGVADZE, E., BUZDIN, A. (2005) NEW MECHANISM OF RETROGENE FORMATION IN MAMMALIAN GENOMES: IN VIVO RECOMBINATION DURING RNA REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (MOSCOW), MAY-JUN;39(3):364-373.

BUZDIN, A., VINOGRADOVA, T., LEBEDEV, Y., SVERDLOV, E. (2005) GENOME-WIDE EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION AND FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPECIFIC RETROELEMENTS. CYTOGENET. GENOME RES.;110(1-4):468-474., IN THE SPECIAL ISSUE: “RETROTRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS AND GENOME EVOLUTION”

GOGVADZE, E., BUZDIN, A., SVERDLOV, E. (2005) MULTIPLE TEMPLATE SWITCHES DURING LINE DIRECTED REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION IS A GENERAL MECHANISM OF THE CHIMERIC RETROELEMENT FORMATION IN MAMMALS. RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 31(1):82-89

CHALAYA T., GOGVADZE E., BUZDIN A., KOVALSKAYA E., SVERDLOV E.D. (2004). IMPROVING SPECIFICITY OF DNA HYBRIDIZATION-BASED METHODS. NUCLEIC ACIDS RES., 32(16):E130.

BUZDIN, A. (2004) RETROELEMENTS AND FORMATION OF CHIMERIC RETROGENES. CMLS, CELL. MOL. LIFE SCI. 61(16):2046-2059

BUZDIN, A., GOGVADZE, E., KOVALSKAYA, E., VOLCHKOV, P., USTYUGOVA, S., ILLARIONOVA, A., FUSHAN, A., VINOGRADOVA, T., SVERDLOV, E. (2003) THE HUMAN GENOME CONTAINS MANY TYPES OF CHIMERIC RETROGENES GENERATED THROUGH IN VIVO RNA RECOMBINATION. NUCLEIC ACIDS RES., 31(15):4385-4390.

BUZDIN, A., LEBEDEV, YU., SVERDLOV, E. (2003) HUMAN SPECIFIC HERV-K LTRS IN GENE INTRONS HAVE A NON-RANDOM ORIENTATION AND, POSSIBLY, PARTICIPATE IN ANTISENSE REGULATION OF THE GENE EXPRESSION. RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 29(1):103-106.

BUZDIN, A., USTYUGOVA, S., KHODOSEVICH, K., MAMEDOV, I., LEBEDEV, Y., HUNSMANN, G., SVERDLOV, E. (2003) HUMAN-SPECIFIC SUBFAMILIES OF HERV-K (HML-2) LONG TERMINAL REPEATS: THREE MASTER GENES WERE ACTIVE SIMULTANEOUSLY DURING BRANCHING OF HOMINOID LINEAGES. GENOMICS, 81(2):149-156.

BUZDIN, A., USTYUGOVA, S., GOGVADZE, E., LEBEDEV, Y., HUNSMANN, G., SVERDLOV, E. (2003) GENOME-WIDE TARGETED SEARCH FOR HUMAN SPECIFIC AND POLYMORPHIC L1 INTEGRATIONS. HUMAN GENETICS, 112(5-6):527-533.

BUZDIN, A., USTYUGOVA, S., GOGVADZE, E., VINOGRADOVA, T., LEBEDEV, Y., SVERDLOV, E. (2002) A NEW FAMILY OF CHIMERIC RETROTRANSCRIPTS FORMED BY A FULL COPY OF U6 SMALL NUCLEAR RNA FUSED TO THE 3′ TERMINUS OF L1. GENOMICS, 80(4):402-406.

MAMEDOV, I., BATRAK, A., BUZDIN, A., ARZUMANYAN, E., LEBEDEV, Y., SVERDLOV, E. (2002) GENOME-WIDE COMPARISON OF DIFFERENCES IN THE INTEGRATION SITES OF INTERSPERSED REPEATS BETWEEN CLOSELY RELATED GENOMES. NUCLEIC ACIDS RES., 30(14):E71.

BUZDIN, A., REVINA, L., KOSTINA, L., ZALUNIN, I., CHESTUKHINA, G. (2002) INTERACTION OF 65- AND 62-KD PROTEINS FROM THE APICAL MEMBRANES OF THE AEDES AEGYPTI LARVAE MIDGUT EPITHELIUM WITH CRY4B AND CRY11A ENDOTOXINS OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS. BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSCOW), 67(5):540-546.

BUZDIN, A., KHODOSEVICH, K., MAMEDOV, I., VINOGRADOVA, T., LEBEDEV, Y., HUNSMANN, G., SVERDLOV, E. (2002) A TECHNIQUE FOR GENOME-WIDE IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENCES IN THE INTERSPERSED REPEATS INTEGRATIONS BETWEEN CLOSELY RELATED GENOMES AND ITS APPLICATION TO DETECTION OF HUMAN-SPECIFIC INTEGRATIONS OF HERV-K LTRS. GENOMICS, 79(3):413-422.

KRIEGER, I., REVINA, L., KOSTINA, L., BUZDIN, A., ZALUNIN, I., CHESTUKHINA, G., STEPANOV, V. (1999) MEMBRANE PROTEINS OF AEDES AEGYPTI LARVAE BIND TOXINS CRY4B AND CRY11A OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SSP. ISRAELENSIS. BIOCHEMISTRY (MOSCOW), 64(10):1163-1168.

FREQUENT ALLELIC LOSSES IN TUMOR-ASSOCIATED STROMAL CELLS AND TUMOR EPITELIUM OF PROSTATE CANCER. KEKEEVA TV, POPOVA OP, SHEGAĬ PV, ZAVALISHINA LE, ANDREEVA IUIU, ZALETAEV DV, NEMTSOVA MV. MOL BIOL (MOSK). 2008 JAN-FEB;42(1):96-101.

ABBERANT METHYLATION OF P16, HIC1, N33 AND GSTP1 GENES IN TUMOR EPITELIUM AND TUMOR-ASSOCIATED STROMAL CELLS OF PROSTATE CANCER. KEKEEVA TV, POPOVA OP, SHEGAĬ PV, ALEKSEEV BIA, ADNREEVA IUIU, ZALETAEV DV, NEMTSOVA MV. MOL BIOL (MOSK). 2007 JAN-FEB;41(1):79-85.

KUZMINA N.B., BORISOV N.M. HANDLING COMPLEX RULE-BASED MODELS OF MITOGENIC CELL SIGNALING (ON THE EXAMPLE OF ERK ACTIVATION UPON EGF STIMULATION. INTERNATIONAL PROCEEDINGS OF CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIROMENTAL ENGINEERING, 2011, V. 5, P. 76-82.

BORISOV N., AKSAMITIENE A., KIYATKIN A., LEGEWIE S., BERKHOUT J., MAIWALD TH., KAIMACHNIKOV N., TIMMER J., HOEK J., KHOLODENKO B. SYSTEMS-LEVEL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN INSULIN – EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR NETWORKS AMPLIFY MITOGENIC SIGNALING. MOLECULAR SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, 2009, V.5, ARTICLE 256.

BORISOV N.M., CHISTOPOLSKY A.S., FAEDER J.R. AND KHOLODENKO B.N. DOMAIN-ORIENTED REDUCTION OF RULE-BASED NETWORK MODELS. IET SYSTEMS BIOLOGY, 2008, V. 2, P. 342-351.

KIYATKIN A., AKSAMITIENE E., MARKEVICH N.I., BORISOV N.M., HOEK J.B., KHOLODENKO B.N. SCAFFOLDING PROTEIN GAB1 SUSTAINS EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED MITOGENIC AND SURVIVAL SIGNALING BY MULTIPLE POSITIVE FEEDBACK LOOPS. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 2006, V. 281, P.19925-19938.

BORISOV N.M., MARKEVICH N.I., HOEK J.B., KHOLODENKO B.N. TRADING THE MICRO-WORLD OF COMBINATORIAL COMPLEXITY FOR THE MACRO-WORLD OF PROTEIN INTERACTION DOMAINS. BIOSYSTEMS, 2006, V. 83, P. 152-166.

BORISOV N.M., MARKEVICH N.I., HOEK J.B., KHOLODENKO B.N. SIGNALLING THROUGH RECEPTORS AND SCAFFOLDS: INDEPENDENT INTERACTIONS REDUCE COMBINATORIAL COMPLEXITY. BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 2005, V. 89, P. 951-966.

JONES RB, SONG H, XU Y, GARRISON KE, BUZDIN AA, ANWAR N, HUNTER DV, MUJIB S, MIHAJLOVIC V, MARTIN E, LEE E, KUCIAK M, RAPOSO RA, BOZORGZAD A, MEIKLEJOHN DA, NDHLOVU LC, NIXON DF, OSTROWSKI MA. LINE-1 RETROTRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT DNA ACCUMULATES IN HIV-1-INFECTED CELLS. J VIROL. 2013 DEC;87(24):13307-20. DOI: 10.1128/JVI.02257-13.

BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE BASED ON GENERATION OF VISUAL IMAGES, BOBROV P, FROLOV A, CANTOR C, FEDULOVA I, BAKHNYAN M, ZHAVORONKOV A. PLOS ONE. 2011;6(6):E20674. EPUB 2011 JUN 10.

ZHAVORONKOV A, CANTOR CR., METHODS FOR STRUCTURING SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE FROM MANY AREAS RELATED TO AGING RESEARCH. PLOS ONE. 2011;6(7):E22597. EPUB 2011 JUL 22.

MOSKALEV AA, SMIT-MCBRIDE Z, SHAPOSHNIKOV MV, PLYUSNINA EN, ZHAVORONKOV A, BUDOVSKY A, TACUTU R, FRAIFELD VE. GADD45 PROTEINS: RELEVANCE TO AGING, LONGEVITY AND AGE-RELATED PATHOLOGIES. AGEING RES REV. 2012 JAN;11(1):51-66. EPUB 2011 OCT 5

MOSKALEV AA, SHAPOSHNIKOV MV, PLYUSNINA EN, ZHAVORONKOV A, BUDOVSKY A, YANAI H, FRAIFELD VE.THE ROLE OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN AGING THROUGH THE PRISM OF KOCH-LIKE CRITERIA. AGEING RES REV. 2012 FEB 14.

ZABOLOTNEVA AA, ZHAVORONKOV A, GARAZHA AV, ROUMIANTSEV SA, BUZDIN AA. CHARACTERISTIC PATTERNS OF MICRORNA EXPRESSION IN HUMAN BLADDER CANCER. . FRONT GENET. 2013 JAN 4;3:310. DOI: 10.3389/FGENE.2012.00310.

BASKAEV KK, KHOLODENKO RV, MALAKHOVA GV, GAĬFULLIN NM, KORZENEVA EA, SUNTSOVA MV, BUZDIN AA. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPECIFIC PROTEIN CODING OPEN READING FRAME C11ORF72. BIOORG KHIM. 2013 MAR-APR;39(2):151-8.

NEPOMNYASHCHAYA YN, ARTEMOV AV, ROUMIANTSEV SA, ROUMYANTSEV AG, ZHAVORONKOV A. NON-INVASIVE PRENATAL DIAGNOSTICS OF ANEUPLOIDY USING NEXT-GENERATION DNA SEQUENCING TECHNOLOGIES, AND CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS. CLIN CHEM LAB MED. 2012 SEP 29;0(0):1-14.

ZHAVORONKOV A, SMIT-MCBRIDE Z, GUINAN KJ, LITOVCHENKO M, MOSKALEV A. POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES FOR MODULATING EXPRESSION AND ACCUMULATION OF DEFECTIVE LAMIN A IN LAMINOPATHIES AND AGE-RELATED DISEASES. J MOL MED (BERL). 2012 OCT 23.

MOSKALEV A, PLYUSNINA E, SHAPOSHNIKOV M, SHILOVA L, KAZACHENOK A, ZHAVORONKOV A. THE ROLE OF D-GADD45 IN OXIDATIVE, THERMAL AND GENOTOXIC STRESS RESISTANCE. CELL CYCLE. 2012 OCT 24;11(22).

ZABOLOTNEVA AA, ZHAVORONKOV AA, SHEGAY PV, GAIFULLIN NM, ALEKSEEV BY, ROUMIANTSEV SA, GARAZHA AV, KOVALCHUK O, ARAVIN A, BUZDIN AA. A SYSTEMATIC EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF MICRORNA MARKERS OF HUMAN BLADDER CANCER. FRONT GENET. 2013 NOV 15;4:247. DOI: 10.3389/FGENE.2013.00247

BOOKS AND CHAPTERS:

RECENT INSERTS OF TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS AFFECT STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN GENOME. ANTON BUZDIN, MARIA SUNTSOVA, OLGA BANTYSH, ELENA ALEKSANDROVA, ANASTASIA ZABOLOTNEVA, ELENA GOGVADZE, AND NURSHAT GAIFULLIN (2012) CHAPTER NO. 23 IN “RADIOBIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY”, EDS. C.E. MOTHERSILL, V. KOROGODINA AND C.B. SEYMOUR. SPRINGER, ISBN 978-94- 007-1999-6 (PB) P: 269-297.

D.A. GHILAROV, A.А. BUZDIN. ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL SEQUENCES CONTROL THE TRANSCRIPTION OF MANY HOST GENES IN EUKARYOTES (2009). CHAPTER IN “VIRAL GENOMES: DIVERSITY, PROPERTIES AND PARAMETERS” NOVA SCIENCE PUBLISHERS (USA) PAGES: 35-63. ISBN: 978-1-60741-067-6.

MONOGRAPH “NUCLEIC ACIDS HYBRIDIZATION: MODERN APPLICATIONS”. EDS. : ANTON BUZDIN, SERGEY LUKYANOV; SPRINGER (2007) ISBN 978-1-4020-6039-7.

NUCLEIC ACIDS HYBRIDIZATION: POTENTIALS AND LIMITATIONS (ANTON BUZDIN)

CHAPTER IN “NUCLEIC ACIDS HYBRIDIZATION: MODERN APPLICATIONS”. EDS.: ANTON BUZDIN, SERGEY LUKYANOV, SPRINGER (2007) ISBN 978-1-4020-6039-7.

SELECTIVE SUPPRESSION OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND ITS MOST POPULAR APPLICATIONS (SERGEY LUKYANOV, KONSTANTIN LUKYANOV, NADEZHDA GURSKAYA, EKATERINA BOGDANOVA, ANTON BUZDIN).

SUPPRESSION SUBTRACTIVE HYBRIDIZATION (SERGEY LUKYANOV, DENIS REBRIKOV, ANTON BUZDIN).

STEM-LOOP OLIGONUCLEOTIDES AS HYBRIDIZATION PROBES AND THEIR PRACTICAL USE IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOMEDICINE (ANTON BUZDIN, SERGEY LUKYANOV).

COINCIDENCE CLONING: ROBUST TECHNIQUE FOR ISOLATION OF COMMON SEQUENCES (ANTON BUZDIN).

DNA HYBRIDIZATION IN SOLUTION FOR MUTATION DETECTION (ANTON BUZDIN).

CURRENT ATTEMPTS TO IMPROVE THE SPECIFICITY OF NUCLEIC ACIDS HYBRIDIZATION (ANTON BUZDIN).

Investors

Our investors are:

Deep Knowledge Ventures, Hong Kong

Deep Knowledge Ventures is a Hong Kong-based venture fund management company focusing on mid- to long-term biotechnology investments at both seed and venture stage.

 

 

 

Pathway Pharmaceuticals, Hong Kong

Pathway Pharmaceuticals is a Hong Kong-based research company focusing on personalized medicine, oncology and age-related diseases.

 

Partners

Jobs

The company is actively hiring and we are actively searching for experts in bioinformatics in the areas of:

  • Transcriptome, microRNA and epigenetic analysis
  • Molecular pathway analysis
  • Data mining
  • Management of large curated drug databases

We prefer candidates from the BWI area with the ability to work full-time in Baltimore.

AGING AND GEROPROTECTORS RESEARCH

Our resources

From the schemes below you can investigate resources of In Silico drug discovery.

pathwaycloudintelligence

Our research

Our research comprises a global network of partners engaged in personalized medicine of cancer and drug discovery in many age-related diseases: Pathway Pharmaceuticals, Vision Genomics, Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Atlas Regeneration and others. The company has a comprehensive science advisory board comprised of top geneticists and computer scientists chaired by Charles Cantor.
slide1

We are experts in signaling pathway analysis in cancer and other age-related diseases. Our strengths are in the ability understand the difference between tissue-specific functional states and evaluating the ability of drugs to correct the difference between or manipulate functional states with proven results in clinical oncology. The company uses platform-agnostic gene expression analysis algorithms to score drugs based on their ability to activate or inhibit certain signaling pathways. These results are useful to pharmaceutical companies for evaluating the efficacy of drugs as illustrated below.

Drug-Disease Score:
pharma1

Drug-Drug Comparison:
pharma2

A better understanding of mechanisms involved in aging will help to address many different diseases that occur in disproportionately in old patients relative to young patients.
slide5

IN SILICO DRUG DISCOVERY

Our missions & goals

Our mission statement and our pledge to our investors, friends and families: 

Through excellence in knowledge management, machine learning and bioinformatics, relentless pursuit for new drug, omics and clinical outcomes data, development of reliable in silico drug screening methods, novel validation approaches and strong international partnerships in personalized medicine we strive to find real working solutions to cure and prevent age-related diseases and aging itself.

This mission will be achieved within the regulatory frameworks as well as the legal and ethical boundaries and by working with the outstanding scientists, academic and medical institutions and pharmaceutical companies of impeccable credibility.

Our goals are:

  • to become the first and the largest drug discovery company in aging and age-related diseases;
  • to become the first company to fully implement the concept of personalized science, where medicine is developed, tested and validated for individual patients in a safe high-throughput environment;

Some of our near-term milestones are:

  • to develop and validate a set of geroprotectors, drugs and therapeutic protocols with aging-suppressive or regenerative properties;
  • to validate and improve Geroscope, a system for in silico geroprotector discovery;
  • to use Geroscope on a large list of possible geroprotectors to rank them by the predicted efficacy and validate using human cells and on model organisms;
  • to develop the most comprehensive scalable drug knowledge management system of annotated drugs, small molecules, biologics and all other factors that may influence the many events on the molecular, cellular and tissue levels;
  • to use our expertise in targeted drug selection based on individual patient’s gene expression data and signaling cloud regulation for drug discovery;
  • to partner with the top pharmaceutical companies to help analyze their drug databases, lead compounds and to enable them to accurately predict the efficacy of their drugs on patient groups and individual patients;

Our method

Since 2008 the In Silico Medicine research team worked hard to develop a comprehensive database of tissue-specific gene expression profiles from a large number of healthy patients, who lost their lives in accidents. This database was thoroughly analyzed, categorized and annotated. In parallel, we constructed multiple databases of gene expression from the many cancer biopsies, before and after treatment.

We developed tools to map gene expression data onto signaling pathways and developed algorithms for evaluating the individual pathway activation strengths and to analyze and measure the state of the overall signaling pathway cloud.

We then developed an annotated database of just over 150 targeted compounds acting on various molecular targets and network elements. We developed another set of algorithms to evaluate the activity of these drugs on the signaling pathway cloud to predict the effectiveness of these drugs on each patient’s tumor. This research laid the foundation for the development of the OncoFinder (OncoFinder.com), which was purchased by and is now the flagship product of the Hong Kong-based, Pathway Pharmaceuticals, the main research and business partner of In Silico Medicine. The OncoFinder was validated internally with over 220 patients with excellent and yet unpublished results and led to further improvements in the algorithms. The tool is now used to provide medical doctors with a research tool, which may improve their clinical decision making.

The concept of a signaling pathway cloud analysis for aging research. Source: “Signaling pathway cloud regulation for in silico screening and ranking of the potential geroprotective drugs”, Alex Zhavoronkov, Anton Buzdin, Andrey Garazha, Nikolay Borisov, Alexey Moskalev, Frontiers in Genetics, Accepted, In print

In Silico Medicine took the concept of OncoFinder further, but instead of the normal and cancer cells, we evaluate the effects of various drugs on the pathway cloud constructed from gene expression and epigenetic data from cells taken from the old patients with those taken from the young patients with the intent to bring the state of the “old cells” as close to the signaling pathway cloud activation profile of the young cells.

Our original modus operandi was illustrated in the recent perspective publication in the reputable open access journal, Frontiers in Genetics.

PERSONALIZED SCIENCE

About personalized science

Many high net-worth individuals with excellent management skills donate billions of dollars to research via foundations and fellowships, without being directly involved with the research projects. These foundations are typically set up to address a broad cause and usually do not have a core goal-oriented project.

A team of experts is hired to supervise research activities and provide grants to scientists who are usually already funded by the government, academia or industry. Some high net-worth individuals besides donating to basic research would also like to solve personal medical problems and steer some of the research effort. These individuals often have excellent project management and organizational skills, but lack the scientific background and confidence to start their own research projects. In contrast, many young scientists and medical doctors would like to apply their skills to conduct cutting edge research and work with patients, but thus lack management expertise. Personalized science projects could bridge this gap and link patients with management expertise with teams of scientists and physicians who are interested in pursuing goal-oriented science, the patient provides research grants, samples and management expertise. The team of physicians and research scientists executes research projects that address the patient’s future needs and research interests.

To test this personalized science concept, we organized a group of young scientists and physicians with over five hundred active members and conducted a series of thirty weekly lectures on regenerative medicine. In parallel we used social media to create multidisciplinary teams of biophysicists, biologists, geneticists and physicians to work on twenty five research projects with topics spanning from metastatic mineralization of the connective tissue to bioinformatics approaches to personalized medicine in oncology. Using this pool of scientists and physicians it became possible to launch research-personalized science projects to address both patient research interests and needs. Whenever a high net-worth individual with medical problems or would like to prevent possible future medical problems becomes interested in pursuing a research project, the project is announced to the community to form a core team that is funded and co-managed by that individual. These small, goal-oriented teams dedicated to solving specific patient problems may be more effective than large foundations or industries.

Patients provide grant funding to a research organization. The organization provides funding and research infrastructure to young researchers. The research team then interacts with the patient and leading experts in the field to provide care.

Less is more: when N=1 is enough

When it comes to testing the effects of a drug on patients with diagnosed pathologies clinical outcomes are among many measurable factors and incremental increases in the size of the the study group lead to higher confidence in the results. But how do we test the effectiveness of a treatment on patients when the only pathologic process they have is aging and it is not classified as the disease?

There are many ways to approach this problem and the concept of personalized science, when the team of experts works with a single patient to find optimal individual geroprotector regiments for the benefit of the patient and mankind as the whole.

The first phase of the project may include using the patient’s own cells to validate the individual predicted efficacy and toxisity of the various drugs. These may be as simple as a vitamin or aspirin and statins to new chemical substances. No recommendations should be made to the patient. In the case that the patient’s doctor makes a decision to prescribe some of these drugs, it may be possible to analyze a very large number of changes in the bodily fluids, gene expression and epigenetic data in various tissues, physical condition and even locomotive activity to evaluate the dynamic effects of the drug. Even though the regular tests on a single patient may be expensive, even one patient may help validate the effectiveness of a geroprotector. With time and more patients this model may lead to significant advances in aging research for drug discovery.

Personalized longevity science: personalized biomarker tracking, drug and therapy selection and drug discovery.